What Is An IRS Revenue Officer & What Do They Do?

IRS Revenue Officer on the way to visit a business

Dealing with an IRS Revenue Office can be a challenging and, sometimes, even nerve-racking experience, especially when one shows up at your business or house doorstep unannounced. However, most of the time, these feelings of anxiety and stress are misplaced.

This guide will shed some light on the details surrounding IRS Revenue Officers, what exactly they do, and what to do if one contacts you. We also dispel some common myths and share some handy tips and information so you can use the acquired knowledge to your best advantage. 

 

What Does an IRS Revenue Officer Do?

Often confused with an IRS Revenue Agent, an IRS Revenue Officer is responsible for collecting money (taxes). They are civil employees employed by the IRS Field Collection office and collect taxes by interviewing taxpayers and running asset checks. If they cannot make contact with a taxpayer, they will work with third parties to gather the information they need. 

The general powers of an IRS Revenue Officer include:

  • Finding liens against you.
  • Interviewing 3rd parties about you.
  • Summoning records.
  • Issuing levies. 
  • Commencing seizure proceedings against you without needing a court order (see notes below). 
  • Referring you to the IRS CID if required. 
  • Levying any receivable accounts, bank accounts, subpoena documents, wages, or retirement funds. 

Remember that an IRS Revenue Officer is assigned to specific cases, not just any tax-debt-related case. In the overwhelming majority of cases, an IRS Revenue Officer will visit you if:

(1) The tax issue is associated with your business.

(2) Your tax debt is from older tax years.

(3) Your tax debt exceeds $100,000. 

 

Things to Know:

  • IRS Revenue Officers (1) do NOT carry weapons, (2) can NOT investigate you criminally, and (3) have absolutely NO right/authority to arrest you. 
  • Their badge is usually a plastic lanyard as opposed to that of an IRS Criminal Investigation Divisions (CID) officer, which is golden. 
  • An IRS Revenue Officer has a limited ability when it comes to seizing a taxpayer’s home, thanks to the Revenue and Reform Act of 1998. 
  • Anybody with a 4-year degree (not necessarily with a financial-related background) can get a job as a Revenue Officer. Before one visits you, though, they undergo months of (initial) training, and then ongoing training. 

 

What’s the Difference Between an IRS Revenue Officer and a Revenue Agent?

As already mentioned before, an IRS Revenue Officer collects taxes. Interestingly, they are not graded based on the sums they collect rather than how quickly they close cases. Although this is not always in the taxpayer’s favor, there may be cases when a taxpayer and a Revenue Officer have common goals and aspirations – for the case to be over and done with. 

IRS Revenue Agents, on the other hand, are assigned a different task – that of auditing taxpayers. So, the person that will collect taxes from you is NOT the same individual as the one who performs the audit. 

How Things Work – The Drill

As soon as the IRS assesses the tax, you will be called to pay the due amount (i.e., withholdings and unpaid employee taxes for business owners). If you cannot pay, the IRS will send out several notices. Then, the IRS will make contact with you to identify who is to blame for the underpayment. In doing so (most of the time, at least) an IRS Revenue Officer will visit your business and seek to assess the TFRP (Trust Fund Recovery Penalty), which is another word for the taxes, against as many taxpayers as possible. 

Therefore, you can understand that it is not just you, the business owner, who is at risk for a TFRP assessment – it includes everybody else also managing the finances of the company. It is worth noting that many times, these assessments reveal employees embezzling money from the business.  

Note: Depending on the amount of due tax, your collection case may as well stay with the ACS (Automated Collections System). This also happens when a taxpayer owes money to the IRS. In this case, you may never see an IRS Revenue Officer coming your way. Instead, you will be sent notifications of past due balance. If these are ignored, the IRS will try to collect the owed money via wage garnishments, bank levies, and liens. 

 

What To Do If an IRS Revenue Officer Contacts You

Nine out of ten times, the IRS Revenue Officer will try to determine your ability to pay. That aside, though, they may even investigate you for a TFRP assessment that you have not paid (this usually happens when you have unpaid employee taxes). No matter the reason why an IRS Revenue Officer shows up at your business, we strongly recommend ensuring you get the best representation possible. This can come from an individual that is helping you with this tax matter. You may, however, need a more robust representation, such as a lawyer or tax attorney (many taxpayers seek legal advice before giving an IRS employee any testimony). 

Keep in mind that things are usually fairly serious, especially considering that the IRS has half the field officers they used to have ten years ago. So, there must be a very important reason why you were assigned an IRS Revenue Officer. And, don’t think even for a second that the IRS will take it easy on you. 

When a Revenue Officer visits you for the first time, they should identify themselves by showing their ID (remember, badge carriers are usually from the Criminal Investigation Department). If you are certain that you don’t have fraudsters in front of you, you can sit down with the Revenue Officer and hear the “collection alternative” (i.e., Offer in Compromise) they have to offer you. If you agree to the proposed terms (meaning, a reasonable agreement is presented to you), you put everything behind you. If not, refer to the next section for the appropriate course of action.

In any case, you may want to consult with your tax professional before the IRS Revenue Officer pays their visit. Experienced tax representatives can be of significant assistance to you as they will:

  • Help you figure out your options.
  • Come to the negotiation table with the IRS agent knowing what to do. 
  • Deal with your IRS Revenue Officer and get a better agreement for you (than you). 

Tips:

  • Be honest with your Revenue Officer. You don’t want to annoy them by doing things like incurring a lot of new liabilities or hiding your assets while dealing with them. Just work with them. 
  • Cooperating with an IRS Revenue Officer does NOT mean that you must push yourself into something without considering the “aftermath” and consulting a tax professional. 

 

What To Do If You’re Getting Nowhere With the Revenue Officer

If the IRS Revenue Officer is being unfair or things show that you two will not see eye to eye anytime soon, you could:

  • Speak with their Group Manager (but do not keep your hopes up that they will take your side).
  • Address the Territory Manager (a step above the Group Manager). In this case, ensure you can prove that the IRS Revenue Officer did not act correctly. Otherwise, it may get you into deeper waters. 
  • Wait until you receive a Notice of Federal Tax Lien, Notice of Levy, or a notice proposing a levy and request for a CDP (Collection Due Process) hearing. Then, you or your tax representative can negotiate a better deal with a settlement officer. This action also puts the brakes on the revenue officer, who can do nothing while you appeal. 

Note:

  • It is required by law an IRS Revenue Officer makes their first contact in person, so do not expect a heads-up phone call. 
  • An IRS Revenue Agent will most likely notify you that you are under examination by sending notices to you before a field agent schedules their visit to your business or home. 
  • If you are being visited by an IRS CID officer, call a tax attorney immediately. 
  • If an IRS Revenue Officer or field agent leaves a note or business card on your door, use the contact information on the card and have your representative (i.e., tax or law firm) get in touch with the Revenue Officer. You are either being assessed for (probably) an underpayment of employee withholding or have a tax debt. 

 

The Best Course of Action to Take with a Revenue Officer

Your best bet when an IRS Revenue Officer visits you is to hire a tax professional or tax attorney to help you with your tax issue. Unlike what many people think, this does NOT make you look “guilty” in the eyes of the IRS agent. In fact, most of the time, IRS Revenue Officers admit being glad the taxpayer hired a tax or legal representative because they, as government employees, are not allowed to give any advice (legal or otherwise) that could help resolve your case in an instance. Indeed, the best IRS Revenue Officers want you to be well taken care of and represented. 

But, even if an IRS agent tells you that it is a waste of money and time to hire representation (“You could use the money you pay the tax prep company to repay your taxes”), you definitely need somebody that is 100% on your side. No matter how great a guy an IRS Revenue Officer is, they are still far from being your advocates – their position does not give them such liberty. Nor can they offer tax-related or legal advice. Plus, you will most likely be visited by a government employee that enjoys mowing over taxpayers. It is always good to know that you can get some control back into your own hands with the help of tax experts or legal representation. Plus, you can likely save a great deal of money!

 

Finally, remember that…

IRS Revenue Officers and Agents are ordinary people like the rest of us. This means that they, too, have good and bad days. They also have a significant workload they are called to manage every single day. This can force them to make decisions and offer agreements that may not be of your best interest.

Without a doubt, though, having to handle the stress and anxiety that comes with back taxes and the presence of an IRS Revenue Officer at your premises can lead to even more trouble and problems. For that reason, it is best to ensure you have a tax professional to help you resolve your issue and have your rights as a taxpayer well protected. 

 

All About Tax Penalties

dealing with tax penalties

Tax Day is the date by which you need to submit your individual tax return to the IRS (usually April the 15th each year). If you have all the money to pay your debt, then all is great. But, what happens when you lack the necessary funds? In this case, the IRS may charge tax penalties. The same applies to some other occasions. All of that will be discussed in depth here, so you know exactly what to expect and what to do if you are called to pay tax penalties. 

 

Do You Have to File Taxes?

You must file a tax return if you:

Note that for individual taxpayers under 65 years of age, the standard deductions are $12,000 (single filers), $24,400 for joint filers, and $18,350 for single parents (2019 IRS rules). For single filers over 65 years old, the amount climbs to $13,850 or $20,000 if you are the head of the household. For joint filers where one or both spouses are over 65, the deduction is $25,700. 

 

What is a Tax Penalty?

The IRS charges both interest and penalties in several different instances. For example, you will be called to pay some additional costs for:

  • Failure to file – This means that you did not manage to file your tax return by April 15. Do note, though, that you can request a deadline extension. If it is approved, you won’t be charged any failure-to-file tax penalties. 
  • Failure to pay – You don’t have the money to pay the taxes on your return or are unable to make the needed payment before the expiration of the due date (April 15). Beware, in this case, because you will still have to pay your taxes within the given deadline even if your deadline extension (to file your tax return) request has been approved. 
  • Failure to pay tax – If you don’t make tax payments as you earn income (quarterly), you are penalized for late estimated tax payments. 
  • Dishonored check – You have submitted a preferred payment form (i.e., check), but your bank does not honor it.  Or in other words, your check bounces. 

If you owe money to the IRS, the Internal Revenue Service will send you a Notice of Tax Due and Demand for Payment, which includes not only the owed taxes but also the penalties and interest. 

 

What is The Penalty for Filing Taxes Late?

There are two different scenarios here, according to the Internal Revenue Code §6651(a)(1). 

If you owe taxes and fail to file your tax return on time, the IRS will start charging 5% of every unpaid tax you have to report on your return for every month you are late to file (0.5% for not paying and 4.5% for not filing). The total penalty you may be asked to pay for not filing taxes on time can add up to nearly 48% of the tax owed, plus interest. 

So, basically, the IRS begins to accumulate charges in your name. If you are more than 60 days late, the minimum penalty you will be called to pay equals to the lesser of two sums – either a specific dollar amount (for 2020, it is set at $435) or 100% of the tax required to be paid on your return (plus interest). 

Now, if you are expecting a tax refund and do not file your tax return within the due date, you won’t be charged any fees. However, you won’t be able to receive your refund until you do file your tax return.

Bear in mind that the late filing penalty is NOT the same as the penalty you get for making late payments. You are charged a late filing penalty when you don’t turn in essential tax documents on time, such as your Form 1040. The late payment penalty is applied when you are late in making your tax payments and is 0.5% of your unpaid taxes for every 30 days you do not pay your outstanding taxes. 

 

What is the Penalty for Not Filing Taxes?

If you fail to file, the IRS may file a substitute return for you, which will NOT include your standard deductions included in your return. The only exception to the substitute return is married filing separately or single filing. Under IRC § 6651(a)(1), the penalty is 5% of the due balance, plus an extra 5% for every 30 days (or a fraction thereof) during which you continue to fail filing taxes. The maximum penalty is 25%. 

Notes:

  • As soon as you pay your balance, both interest and penalties stop accruing. 
  • Even if you pay your tax in full before the month ends, the IRS will still apply full monthly charges. 
  • If you cannot pay your balance in full, you could apply for an Installment Agreement to help repay the remaining debt
  • You may be eligible for penalty relief if you have complied with the law requirements but were not able to meet your obligations toward the IRS. 
  • If you disagree with your balance, you can call 1-800-829-1040. Make sure you have all the required paperwork ready (i.e., amended return, canceled checks, etc.) when you make that call to the IRS. 

 

How is the Tax Underpayment Penalty Calculated?

Taxpayers in America pay taxes the moment they make money rather than a lump amount. And, they can pay taxes either by making estimated tax payments or via withholding. The penalty for underpayment of estimated tax is usually applied to individuals that have skipped some tax payments the previous fiscal year. To put it simply, a tax underpayment penalty is a penalty that you owe if you fail to pay enough in estimated tax payments or through withholding during the year. 

Failure to pay proper estimated tax usually comes with a penalty if you owe at least $1,000 when you file the return, per the Internal Revenue Code §6654. You might be able to make unequal payments and annualize your income as a means to lower or even avoid the penalty, though. This typically happens when you receive your income unevenly during the year. 

In some instances, you can waive this penalty:

  1. Your tax payments were (1) 90% or more of the tax liability during the year or 
  2. Your tax payments were 100% of the tax liability of the previous year. 
  3. You did not make a payment due to an out-of-the-blue event, such as a disaster or casualty. 

The IRS may also waive a tax underpayment penalty for retirees over 62 years of age or individuals that became disabled either during the current or the previous tax year. Some exceptions apply for some household employers and fishers. Ask us to give you all the details or read the IRS Publication 505

The IRS calculates your penalty for every installment separately, where they first determine the number of days you are late and then multiply that number by the interest rate that is effective for the installment period. However, you may also check whether you owe a tax underpayment penalty by using Form 2210 (Underpayment of Estimated Tax by Individuals, Estates, and Trusts) or Form 2220 (Underpayment of Estimated Tax by Corporations) depending on your case – look for the flowchart. 

If you do owe a penalty, you will need to figure out what you owe in taxes per quarter (and what you have paid in taxes during this time) to calculate the per-quarter penalty sum. Then, you will get your total penalty amount by totaling your quarterly penalties. According to the IRS, the following interest rates on underpayments apply:

  • 2.5% for the portion of an overpayment over $10,000 (for corporations).
  • 5% for underpayments and overpayments (not for corporations).
  • 4% for corporation overpayments.
  • 7% for large corporate underpayments. 
  • The federal short-term rate + 3% for taxpayers besides corporations (for underpayments).
  • The federal short-term rate + 2% for taxpayers besides corporations (for overpayments). 

Remember that all rates are determined on a quarterly basis. 

 

Tax Penalty and Fee Abatement 

Taxpayers that fail to file, pay, or deposit penalties may qualify for the first-time penalty abatement (FTA) waiver (only applies if there is reasonable cause for not paying or filing taxes on time). The IRS may grant relief to relieve this administrative waiver if certain criteria are met, such as having a clean compliance history (no penalties owed) for at least three years. You may also be eligible for the FTA waiver if you have:

  • Paid all tax due.
  • Made arrangements to pay all tax due (i.e., via an installment agreement – applies to current payments). 
  • Filed all necessary returns and cannot file an outstanding claim for a tax return.
  • Filed a valid extension for the necessary returns and cannot make an outstanding request for a tax return. 

To request penalty abatement over the telephone, you need to provide your tax practitioner with a Power of Attorney authorization to request the penalty on your behalf, especially if your case is being handled by a specific compliance unit. If you don’t receive a letter from the IRS indicating that you meet the FTA criteria and that your penalties have been removed within 30 days from the day you (or your tax practitioner) called them, it is strongly advised to follow up with the IRS. You may, nevertheless, request a penalty abatement by letter or mail, provided that you attach all relevant documents and information, such as transcripts that prove payment or filing compliance and/or a valid power of attorney, among others. 

Important Notes:.

  • If you have paid the penalty, you can file Form 843 and ask for a refund
  • First-time penalty abatement applies to one tax period. If you request for penalty relief for more than one year, your penalty relief will apply to the earliest tax period, as long as you meet the FTA criteria. The subsequent tax years may have a penalty relief based on reasonable cause criteria and other relief provisions. 
  • You may take your case to Appeals if you believe that you can receive penalty relief on hazards of litigation on other factors.

 

Conclusion 

Filing your tax returns and paying your tax bill on time is key to avoiding getting penalties. Nevertheless, in any other case, there are always reasonable IRS payment plans that you could consider. These offer significantly lower interest rates and may even allow you to settle your bill for less than the due amount, such as the Offer in Compromise.

Let’s talk about your options and see what is the best course of action based on your individual case so that you can enjoy a happier and more stress (and debt)-free life from now on. Contact us now and schedule your appointment for a free consultation. 

All About Tax Liens

IRS tax lien

If you owe back taxes, tax liens (and their siblings, tax levies) can affect you seriously if you don’t take proper action. In this guide, we give you all the details you need to know about tax liens, as well as ways to remove them if you get caught in their net. 

 

What Is a Tax Lien?

In simple terms, a tax lien is a claim the government makes on your financial assets (usually your real estate – see a house or another property) when you have not paid your income taxes on time. A tax lien is the first red flag you will get for failing to take care of your income tax obligations. At this point, you don’t risk having your assets seized. However, if you decide to sell the asset, you can expect the government to claim some of the proceeds (or all of them, depending on the sum you owe). However, do bear in mind that a tax lien may appear on your credit report and could:

  • Affect your ability to get a loan or keep a security clearance
  • Stick with you even if you file for bankruptcy.
  • Be a blockage for you when on a job hunt. 
  • Cause your creditworthiness to take a nosedive (the IRS will notify creditors of your financial situation by filing a public notice of the tax lien).
  • Prevent you from refinancing or selling your home (during title searches, things like tax liens do surface). 
  • Cost you a lot of time if you need to go through the IRS automated collection system (ACS) or a revenue officer that requires you to pay them a visit in person. 

A tax levy comes right after a tax lien and has the power to seize your property and bank accounts or even garnish your wages so that the government can eventually get its owed taxes from you. Note that you may receive a lien immediately after the IRS has assessed the tax. Nevertheless, it may take up to several months before the IRS figures out that you have not paid your taxes.

 

What Is a Federal Tax Lien?

Just like a tax lien, a federal tax lien is a federally-authorized lien placed against your assets (or any of them) for back taxes that have not been paid. It gives the US government the right to take or keep your personal property until you pay your due federal taxes. The steps involved from the moment the IRS realizes that you owe money to the government to the point they finally collect their money, are as follows. The IRS will:

  1. Assess the liability.
  2. Notify you with a Notice and Demand for Payment. 
  3. After that comes a public Notice of Federal Tax Lien that all creditors will be able to see. 
  4. Secure your property to secure payment if you continue to have your taxes unpaid, be it an estate, gift, self-employment, income tax, or another.  

Remember that when served a federal tax lien, any assets you may acquire during the lien may also be placed on a tax lien. Overall, a federal tax lien will most likely downgrade your credit score substantially, given that the IRS notifies creditors and individual states that you owe back taxes and that they are the first in line to receive payment for these unpaid taxes. In many instances, you may even be required to pay your due taxes in full so that you can regain your ability to receive any kind of financing. 

 

What Is a State Tax Lien?

This is slightly different from a federal tax lien as it is imposed by the state government. However, it still gives the government authority to secure the owed tax by exercising a legal right over your property, be it personal or real estate. Before any action is taken, the state issues a Notice of State Tax Lien after your tax liabilities are assessed, and a Final Bill for Taxes Due (or a Bill for Taxes Due) is then sent to you. The waiting period between the Bill for Taxes Due and the Notice of State Tax Lien is 35 days. Within that time, you need to reach some sort of appropriate resolution (if you cannot settle your tax debt). Until you do, though, the lien will remain on the property in question. 

Notes:

  • It may take up to three years for the IRS to assess liabilities on federal income taxes (from the date you are required to file or file a tax return). This legal time frame is called a Statute of Limitations, during which the IRS can bring legal action against you. 
  • A statute of limitations can be extended to six years if you underestimate your gross income by over 25%.
  • A statute of limitations can have no time limit if you fail to file a return (fraudulent or not). 
  • Some states follow the 3-year statute of limitations rule (see Ohio, Wisconsin, Michigan, Kentucky, Colorado, California, and Arizona) while others follow the 3-year plan for income taxes owed to the state (i.e., Tennessee, Oregon, New Mexico, Louisiana, and Kansas). 

If you find yourself dealing with a state lien, it is advised to consult with a tax professional to have all your questions about things like the statute of limitations in your state answered. 

A tax professional is undeniably your best line of defense when you want to protect yourself against liens and levies placed on your wages, assets, property, and bank accounts (and get out of the troubles brought by a state or federal tax lien). It is critical that you reach a settlement with the IRS (or appeal a lien) before they place a levy on your property or bank account, to prevent your assets from being seized. 

 

How to Find Out If You Have a Tax Lien

As already mentioned above, the IRS will most likely notify you if a federal tax lien has been filed by sending you a Notice of Federal Tax Lien. In general, a federal lien is effective almost immediately after the IRS issues a written demand for payment of due taxes (within the next 10 days or so). 

Nevertheless, you could find out whether you have a federal lien tax on your own. Given that tax liens are placed with local authorities, we suggest you visit your state’s Secretary of State website. There should be an option that reads UCC Search or Lien Filing. In either case, you will be called to enter some personal details, such as your filing name and other ID information, so you can retrieve the data you seek. 

Other than that, another great resource to figure out if you have a lien is legal databases, which usually offer access to up-to-date information on tax liens for a fee. Now, since your state may also place a lien on your property if you fail to pay the local taxes on time, you may want to check with the county in which your financial asset (the one that a lien may have been placed on) is located. The process varies among states. However, you will need the assistance of your state government offices to help lift your lien and pay your back taxes. In New York, for example, this procedure entails you call (518) 457-5434 or use your online services account to pay your tax bill. Other states offer a wide range of payment options – even provide you with the chance to set up a payment plan for a small fee (see California). 

Note: As soon as you pay your tax debt, remember to request a copy of your credit report so that you can check that the lien has indeed been lifted. If it has not been removed, do contact the relevant credit bureaus to sort this issue out with them. 

 

Can You Sell a House With a Tax Lien?

Yes, it is possible to still be able to sell your home if you have a lien on it. Of course, some conditions need to be met. For instance, you should ensure that you pay your tax lien first and then refinance or sell your home. 

You have two options here (1) pay the lien before you close the deal (you add the lien amount to your expenses) or (2) clear the lien by paying the taxes on your own before selling your house. If the latter is not doable (though, it is the best course of action since a property lien is listed on the title report, which may trouble or worry potential buyers), you could consider the following:

  • File For Chapter 13 Bankruptcy – This is a handy solution that will give you a greater negotiating power. But, that’s all there is to it. Although it will NOT clear your debt, it may open the road for a payment plan that serves you so you can repay your due taxes over a period of time. 
  • Dispute The Lien – Pursue this option if you believe that a lien has been wrongly placed on your property. In this case, the creditor may be willing to lift the lien. In any other case, you can bring your case to the court. If you win, your lien will be released. If you lose, you may be able to work something out with the creditor (some sort of settlement) to reduce the due amount. 
  • Apply For a Subordination – The IRS may discharge the sum of your back taxes so that you can sell or refinance your property or restructure your mortgage.  This means that the IRS will sell (subordinate) your debt to other creditors, who will wait for the closing of the deal to get paid. So, basically, your debt goes from the IRS to another creditor. That way, the title of your home is clear (and is passed on to the buyer clear) while you will still be called to pay the back taxes to the 3rd-party creditor. To apply for a subordination, you could use the services of creditors with liens (i.e., a mortgage company) or apply for a program like the Direct Debit Installment Agreement to have your lien withdrawn after making the needed payments. 
  • Increase The Selling Price – If nothing of the above works, you could add the amount you owe to the IRS to the selling price of your home to cover the property tax lien. Just ensure that the real estate market supports the asked price (the current market value should be around the price at which you are selling your house so that it is attractive to potential buyers). Also, don’t forget to pay your lien before you transfer the ownership of the house. That way, your buyer will get a clear title. 

 

How to Remove a Tax Lien

If you cannot afford to pay your back taxes, which is the single most effective way to stop a tax lien, you could come to some sort of agreement with the IRS. We suggest exploring options like an Offer in Compromise, which may help you settle your back taxes for less than what you really owe. In this case, though, take note that being accepted is quite a long shot. You will also need to fulfill certain conditions:

  • You have filled all of your tax returns.
  • You are not being audited.
  • You are not in bankruptcy.
  • You have made the needed estimated tax payments for the current fiscal year.

You may use this handy tool to check whether you qualify for an Offer in Compromise or not. 

Alternatively, you could consider getting on an IRS payment plan, such as the Direct Debit Installment Agreement, where you grant the IRS the right to take three or more consecutive payments out of your bank account. That way, you may be able to convince them to remove your tax lien from public records. That being said, you will still have to pay penalties and interest (and your tax debt, of course) until your tax balance is paid off. 

This list could go on forever. So, do reach out to us. Let’s sit down and go through your options together. Our expert tax relief professionals know the way to get you out of debt or at least relieve you of your financial strains considerably. Contact us today for a free tax consultation